TEYE Guitars

Born of Viking origins in the Netherlands, Teye was fascinated, nay obsessed with guitars. He started on the family piano at age 4, then finally was allowed a terrible electric guitar which he immediately started modding, searching for the sounds that he heard in his head.

 

He bought his first good guitar, a Gibson, and a few days later Teye sunk in the router to make space for a 3rd pickup. Never mind the warranty: innovation beckoned and the switching he installed as a teenager is not all that different from his current 3-pickup Electric Gypsy guitars.

 

Teye did well in school, very well, and was slated for University but then decided he wanted to dedicate his life to the guitar. He performed and released independent records in the Netherlands, Germany, London and Paris. Together with his father he built guitars and amps – most notably a bolt-for-bolt copy of his see-through Ampeg Dan Armstrong from a raw block of plexiglass.

 

Then Teye got a haircut and entered the Conservatory of Classical Guitar. This wild move was followed by another even more exotic: Teye hitch-hiked into flamenco music and was adopted by a gypsy family in Andalucia who taught him to play authentic flamenco guitar.

 

In Andalucia (southern Spain) Teye found plenty of the incredible moorish architecture that he had been so impressed with since as a young boy he devoured the works of Hal Foster. This fragile and intricate moorish beauty would feature heavily in his later guitar designs. Anyone who’s been to Cordoba, Sevilla and Granada will immediately notice.

 

Teye moved to the USA on invitation of country-rock cult legend Joe Ely and they released an album that mixed Joe’s Americana with Teye’s flamenco guitar: “Letter to Laredo” which made the 1995 year-end top ten of Spin and Rolling Stone.

 

Teye went on to form a pure Flamenco ensemble together with his wife Belen, a flamenco dancer from Sevilla, Spain, and they toured the world. Teye pioneered several inventions for this group: a footswitchable portable dance floor with built-in contact microphones, a MIDI-switched light show, a modular headphone practise flamenco guitar, and he helped perfect the B-band contact soundboard and undersaddle pickup system.

 

And for himself he built a tube distortion pedal, a tube guitar amp, and his own design electric guitar. And then everything changed.

 

The Industry Pros offered Teye serious money for this instrument, and so he started taking orders. His wait list grew to over a year and Teye teamed up with his record company boss Evert Wilbrink and started making guitars in earnest, expanding his line with new designs and also with affordable versions.

 

Teye’s top of the line Master instruments are lauded by the demanding few of the entertainment world (Rich Robinson of the Black Crowes; Cliff Williams of AC/DC; Mick Taylor of the Stones; et al) as well as the Art community since they combine  a stunning presence with some of the greatest Tones to ever come from an electric guitar. Teye painstakingly compiles exotic inlays and hand-engraves aluminum parts until he has created another Masterpiece. Then he fine-tunes each guitars electronic circuit and adjusts the playability to perfection.

 

The resulting Master guitar or bass is befitting of a King, a Sultan, a Maharadja in sheer luxury and opulence. Teye’s guitars routinely win direct A/B-comparisons with the most prized vintage instruments and reside at the top of today’s boutique market. But then they are so much more than just great guitars…